New Books Available (October 2018)

New Books Available at the Library this Summer

 

Fashion : critical and primary sources by

“Winner of the Art Association of Australia and New Zeland prize for Best Edited Book, 2010. Fashion: Critical and Primary Sources is a major multi-volume work of reference which brings together seminal writings on Fashion. The geographical range of the essays crosses Europe, Asia and North America. The essays reveal the wide set of methodological approaches which all bear on the study of Fashion – Sociology, Art History and Cultural History, Anthropology, Social Theory, Dress and Textile Studies. Ordered chronologically, the four volumes cover Late Medieval to Renaissance, the Eighteenth Century, the Nineteenth Century and the Twentieth Century to today.” [Source: Publisher]

 

An anthropology of images : picture, medium, body, by Hans Belting

“This book proposes a new anthropological theory for interpreting human picture making. Rather than focus exclusively on pictures as they are embodied in various media such as painting, sculpture, or photography, he links pictures to our mental images and therefore, our bodies”. [Source: Publisher]

 

Footnotes in Gaza, by Joe Sacco

“Rafah, a town at the southernmost tip of the Gaza Strip, is a squalid place. Raw concrete buildings front rubbish-strewn alleys. The narrow streets are crowded with young children and unemployed men. Situated on the border with Egypt, swaths of Rafah have been reduced to rubble. Rafah is today and has always been a notorious flashpoint in this most bitter of conflicts. Buried deep in the archives is one bloody incident, in 1956, that left 111 Palestinian refugees dead, shot by Israeli soldiers. Seemingly a footnote to a long history of killing, that day in Rafah – coldblooded massacre or dreadful mistake – reveals the competing truths that have come to define an intractable war. In a quest to get to the heart of what happened, Joe Sacco arrives in Gaza and, immersing himself in daily life, uncovers Rafah, past and present. Spanning fifty years, moving fluidly between one war and the next, alive with the voices of fugitives and schoolchildren, widows and sheikhs, Footnotes in Gaza captures the essence of a tragedy. As in Palestine and Safe Area Goražde , Joe Sacco’s unique visual journalism has rendered a contested landscape in brilliant, meticulous detail. Footnotes in Gaza , his most ambitious work to date, transforms a critical conflict of our age into intimate and immediate experience.” [Source: Publisher]

 

Paris primitive : Jacques Chirac’s museum on the Quai Branly, by Sally Price

“In 1990 Jacques Chirac, the future president of France and a passionate fan of non-European art, met Jacques Kerchache, a maverick art collector with the lifelong ambition of displaying African sculpture in the holy temple of French culture, the Louvre. Together they began laying plans, and ten years later African fetishes were on view under the same roof as the Mona Lisa. Then, in 2006, amidst a maelstrom of controversy and hype, Chirac presided over the opening of a new museum dedicated to primitive art in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower: the Muse;e du Quai Branly. Paris Primitive recounts the massive reconfiguration of Paris‘s museum world that resulted from Chirac’s dream, set against a backdrop of personal and national politics, intellectual life, and the role of culture in French society. Along with exposing the machinations that led to the MQB’s creation, Sally Price addresses the thorny questions it raises about the legacy of colonialism, the balance between aesthetic judgments and ethnographic context, and the role of institutions of art and culture in an increasingly diverse France. Anyone with a stake in the myriad political, cultural, and anthropological issues raised by the MQB will find Price’s account fascinating.” [Source: Publisher]

 

The lathe of heaven, by Ursula Le Guin

“George Orr is a mild and unremarkable man who finds the world a less than pleasant place to live: seven billion people jostle for living space and food. But George dreams dreams which do in fact change reality – and he has no means of controlling this extraordinary power. Psychiatrist Dr William Haber offers to help. At first sceptical of George’s powers, he comes to astonished belief. When he allows ambition to get the better of ethics, George finds himself caught up in a situation of alarming peril.” [Source: Publisher]

 

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